Impostor Syndrome...Me??

Have you ever questioned your competency or skills in a situation or role? Impostor Syndrome is defined as “a psychological pattern in which an individual doubts their accomplishments and has a persistent internalized fear of being exposed as a "fraud". While most people that experience this professionally do not to such a great extreme, it is common especially in women. Some of it could stem from the social pressures of trying to downplay your successes or not to self-promote that becomes so inherent that you start doubting your accomplishments and attributing them to external factors. Many men seem to display these characteristics too from time to time.

I have experienced impostor syndrome several times in my career. Every time I land that next great career opportunity, I victimize myself! The fear of failure or a new challenge, the fear of venturing into the unknown and overextending your skills, the fear of being discovered for what you don’t know. It can be intimidating or overwhelming and for some paralyzing, where it may limit them from taking on new ventures. Fortunately for me, being a risk-taker, I thrive in chaos. So, despite the impostor syndrome I have experienced, it has never thwarted my career. It only pushes me to learn and master the new role or niche so I can become a subject matter expert as soon as possible. It drives me to excel.

But if you are one of those that constantly battles this and it is indeed holding you back or sabotaging your career, here are some strategies that can help:

  • List your career accomplishments and celebrate them often
  • Review the challenges you have overcome in your personal and professional life
  • Do not minimize your wins. Next time you feel the urge to say “I was just lucky”, “I just happened to be at the right place”...remind yourself of the effort, strategy and planning that went into that achievement
  • Reach out to your professional network and tap into other’s experiences in the area that you feel uncomfortable in
  • Build a support network of individuals that uplift your confidence (your personal cheerleading squad) and indulge in activities that boost your confidence
  • Be authentic. No one expects you to know it all and it is perfectly fine to say, “I don’t know but I will find out”. People will respect you for your honesty and showing vulnerability is a trait of a confident leader
  • Challenge that inner negative voice, channel your positive thoughts and reframe the situation that is causing you anxiety
  • Drive yourself to become a subject matter expert in the area

You would not have made it so far, if you were an impostor, so get over it!

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

46 Hits
0 Comments

The Cultural Leadership effect -- it starts with you

The leadership team is responsible for strategy. It is a major portion of our many meeting agendas. We have all seen or created the list of items and our strategy focus may vary from how to enhance our service line growth, to retaining and recruiting more nurses, or focusing on the improvement necessary to boost the patient scores and much, much more: however, as leaders we all know what must always be forefront on our strategic agenda, taking care of our employees.

How many times have you seen where the Administrative Team gets together, decides they are all going to Round together, and their assistants (with repetitive internal mirth) agonizingly make the schedule, coordinating whereby everyone can Round together. It lasts for a few months, weeks or even never gets completely off the ground despite the many studies showing its benefit. It is not out of leadership neglect, but the daily re-prioritization battle that necessitates our lives. Nevertheless, the focus on your employees must always take precedence.

The questions must then be asked: How is this precedence displayed? How do you show you care about your employees? Read Full Article.

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

14 Hits
0 Comments

Understanding that Other’s May Think Differently

Photo Credit: Jeff Widener, Associated Press

Years ago, my sister taught a Sunday School class of 5-year old boys. At 11 p.m. one Saturday she suddenly remembered that she had a schedule conflict and needed me to teach her class. I got up early the next morning to study the lesson and to cut out and color smiley faces. As the time for church neared, I gathered all my materials and headed for the door. I suddenly remembered that my sister had told me to take them a snack, but a quick glance at the clock told me I was out of time. If I did not leave then, I would be late for church.

About halfway through the hour-long lesson Daniel suddenly became concerned. He looked and sounded like a little man dressed in his navy-blue business suit with white shirt and tie, “Do you have a snack for us?”

“No, Daniel, I ran out of time while preparing the lesson. I am sorry. There will not be a snack today.”

Daniel folded his arms and crossed one leg over the other. He gave me a look of stern disapproval and in an even, authoritarian tone stated, “Our teacher ALWAYS has a snack for us.”

“Daniel, I am sorry, but I do not have a snack. I did not have time.”

Daniel looked at me like a boss who was not going to accept excuses. “You are not a very good teacher.” Another little boy sounding very much like “a little boy” said, “Yeah, you’re not a very good teacher.”

And in that moment, I knew that Daniel had taught me a very important lesson.[i] I thought to be a good teacher I needed to know my lesson and color and cut out smiley faces, but Daniel knew that the most important key to being a good teacher was to bring snacks, and if Daniel was my boss, and I did not bring snacks, I was not going to get a good performance review. Read Full Article.

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

20 Hits
0 Comments

Impacting Change Through Challenge

While talking with volunteers at the information desk, in walks the sweetest elderly couple. Both were in their mid to late 80s. The wife is using a cane with one hand and holding onto her husband for support with the other.

An early August day, outside temperatures were in the upper 90s. It was my first week working within a $40M health system as interim CEO and consultant. The facility offered a vast array of both general and specialized services. Without counting the licensed beds, one would never know it was not an urban health system, but rather a Critical Access Hospital.

As they approach, I greet them with a smile and ask if there’s anything I can do to help. The husband said they were here for some laboratory work.

The long walk from the parking lot during the heat of the day had clearly taken its toll on them both, but thankfully, the Laboratory/Radiology department was nearby. The lab tech quickly came out, offering the husband a seat in the hallway and taking the wife back into the offices for her blood work.

I looked around and noticed the “waiting area” consisted of a few hard-plastic chairs sitting in a major traffic area right off the main lobby.

Little did I know what awaited me, as I told the husband I would get him some ice water and be right back. That is when the adventure began … Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

25 Hits
0 Comments

Decision Making Traps: Decider Beware

Leadership Transformation Series

This is Part 4A in this Four-part Leadership Transformation Series (LTS); 4B will follow.

Transformation in healthcare is personal: it requires the transformation of health system leaders. The LTS begins to speak to key differences in some of the fundamentals of transformational vs traditional leadership in healthcare.

This article focuses on how we make decisions: 4A Reviews decision-making errors.

4B Addresses how to mitigate decision-making errors

Leaders – and their organizations - succeed or fail based on their decisions. Yet the evidence is clear that our decision making is perilously fraught with biases and irrational behaviors of which we are not even aware. These biases are so ingrained in our psyche that, like water to fish, we cannot imagine that they are even there, much less clouding our view – regardless of how “well-intended and objective” we believe we are. In short, bad decision-making is largely hard-wired.’ Just as many medical errors are associated with unexplained variation in medical decision-making (How Doctors Think), so too are many leadership errors are associated with unexplained variation in management decision making.

Traditional change is oriented in the past; it involves more, faster, better, but not different (Daniel Prosser). Transformation is future-oriented; it requires the creation of something from nothing, i.e., letting go and giving up something in the past to create something new. This means that, to do transformation well, it is even more important that our hidden decision biases be flushed out and made explicit. Leaders on a transformation journey are at higher risk for decision making traps and consequences than in traditional change. Said differently, leadership decision making in transformation is less forgiving.

A brief review of categories and types of decision and judgement errors include the following: (Read Full Article)

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

40 Hits
0 Comments

What Southwest Airlines can teach us about running our own organizations

In an industry where its competitors have frequently gotten into serious financial difficulty, Southwest Airlines has maintained profitability every year for the previous 45 years. This is an amazing accomplishment. We will explore some of the strategies that Southwest Airlines has used to drive that success.

Southwest Airlines has only ever flown one type of airplane, Boeing 737’s. All its pilots, flight attendants, ground crews and mechanics are trained to work with every plane Southwest owns. Southwest must maintain a parts inventory for only one type of plane. I see two lessons to be learned from the strategy. The first is the value of simplicity. The second is the importance of sticking to your strategy. I am sure that over the years they were tempted at times to buy smaller planes to service smaller markets and to buy bigger planes to service foreign markets. Southwest did not yield to the siren call of chasing every potential customer. They would only pursue those customers who fit within their business model.

Southwest Airlines does not believe that the customer is always right. The late Herb Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines, said that the customer is not always right. “And I think that’s one of the biggest betrayals of employees a boss can possibly commit. The customer is sometimes wrong. We don’t carry those sorts of customers. We write to them and say, ‘Fly somebody else. Don’t abuse our people.’” So, what does this approach do for Southwest’s customer service? My own experience is that Southwest employees have always been warm and gracious to my family and me. But for more objective evidence we will look at the Temkin Experience Ratings. Southwest has rated number one for customer experience among US airlines every year since 2011 except for 2015. Read Full Article.

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

53 Hits
0 Comments

Five things every CEO needs to do

It is a truth. As CEOs, we are pulled in many directions. The incessant priorities, though seemingly always valuable, will consistently distract us from our most meaningful impact. How does a CEO maintain their focus and discipline on what is important when everything is significant? They must focus on what is central to the organization’s success. The following five imperatives will aid in this journey:

1) Visible Listener:

The CEO must be a good listener who spends time greeting, listening and positively interacting with the individuals on the floors and in the clinics. Ninety-Five percent of your time should be spent listening. Hearing from the people doing the work who can keep you informed of the issues they are solving through the work-around of their own ingenuity. You have an opportunity to develop relationships, listen for trends, solve problems and gain credibility as a CEO who cares about the people enough to make them a priority in your busy day. Read Full Article.https://www.rodneyreider.com/blog/2019/2/7/five-things-every-ceo-needs-to-do

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

52 Hits
0 Comments

Dealing with Narcissism at Work?

Have you experienced any of these characteristics with a coworker or a boss?

  • The need to be “right” all the time
  • Quick to take credit for everything but be the first to assign blame on others
  • Minimize people and their emotions
  • Pit employees against each other
  • Desire to be appreciated and attended to all the time
  • Show no consideration for others or display empathy or compassion
  • Inconsistent behavior – you may be their best colleague/employee one minute and they may be threatening to fire you the next
  • Insistence on compliance with their demands regardless of how unreasonable they might be
  • Complete disregard of ethics, standards and morals, like they are above the law

If any or all these behaviors seem familiar to you, then run as far as you can from this individual, especially if they are your boss! Since that may not always be an option, below are some strategies that will help you deal with narcissists.

  1. Make them look good. Praise and acknowledgement make them tick
  2. Give them the attention they need, within reason. They feel threatened when you do not comply with their own self worth and aggrandization
  3. Do not try to reason or argue with them, it will just aggravate them. Let them talk while you listen
  4. Learn their pet peeves and avoid those. Similarly, learn what is important to them and cater to that
  5. Build a wall – you cannot take anything these individuals say personally. They can be manipulative and abusive, damaging your self-esteem. Disengage with them
  6. Find your drivers – do not expect them to motivate you and do not let them take you down. Keep the fire burning by focusing on what’s important for you
  7. Be proactive. While this is a good management mantra all the time, learn the triggers to narcissistic behaviors and control their occurrence as much as you can
  8. Enhance your emotional intelligence and learn tactics to cope with the behaviors professionally
  9. Let them micromanage or make decisions. They want their way and will get it. If you don’t agree with it voice your concerns but don’t expect to have the final say

Narcissists may be very successful entrepreneurs or professionals owing to their ability to turn on the charm and risk-taking skills, but they make ineffective leaders. Learning how to cope with narcissists in the workplace can be a great lesson in managing up or around!

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

114 Hits
0 Comments

The Operating Model: Closing the Strategy-Execution Gap

Leadership Transformation Series

The Operating Model: Closing the Strategy-Execution Gap

This is Part 3 of a Four-Part Leadership Transformation Series (LTS).

Read Part 1 and Part 2.

Transformation in healthcare is personal: it requires the transformation of health system leaders. This LTS begins to speak to key differences in some of the fundamentals of transformational vs traditional leadership in healthcare.

This article focuses on how leaders operate.

You have a strategy. How do you rate your organization’s execution of that strategy on a 1-10 scale? For most, it is not high – or as high as they would like. Closing the strategy-implementation (aka, the knowing-doing or what-how) gap is the leadership Achilles heel of any business, but especially for hospitals, a business recognized by Drucker as the most complex organization to lead. Given that his observation pre-dated some of today’s larger and more evolved and blended academic-community healthcare systems, the complexity he referred to then has only increased. Across industries, the results of studies consistently identify unsuccessful execution for the vast majority of strategies; and the results of CEO surveys cite execution as the biggest current challenge, but reasons for such failure and concern vary widely. A sampling of HBR articles on the topic cite too much of an internal focus, poor CEO preparation in both strategy AND execution, “a people problem.” (Read Full Article)

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

73 Hits
0 Comments

What learning to fly taught me about handling adversity

""When everything seems to be going against you, remember the airplane takes off against the wind, not with it", Henry Ford.

Ask any pilot if they remember the first time they flew the airplane alone. And you’ll get a resounding yes! The solo flight is a milestone in each pilot’s life, it’s the time when preparation and opportunity all come together. You are alone in the airplane, no instructor by your side correcting mistakes, keeping you safe, it’s all up to you.

Although my solo was over 20 years ago, I remember it as though it were yesterday. The weather, the sounds of the engine and the wheels rolling down the runway. But what I remember the most about that day is looking over to my right and seeing that empty seat next to me, knowing I was completely responsible for returning this aircraft safely to the ground, intact.

Whether your piloting an aircraft, an organization or a team, how you face and ultimately handle adversity will largely determine your success or failure. What my instructor taught me long ago was a simple lesson, the goal for each flight is for takeoffs to equal landings, what happens in between is up to you and will determines your success in achieving this goal. Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

83 Hits
0 Comments

How to ‘Stop the Insanity’ and Pave the Way to Real Achievements

I am sure you have heard the old adage “the definition of insanity is to keep doing the same thing over and over again expecting a different result.” I would like to expand to that definition “and doing something without appropriate planning and expecting a better outcome.” Have you ever witnessed an unexpected result or outcome followed by a flurry of activity which is expected to positively impact the outcome? The danger of this reactionary activity is the false sense that the problem is being solved. Reactionary activity may address the fringe of the problem, but the root cause remains festering and aggravating the organization. To help with the risk of confusing activity with root cause problem solving, I suggest the Four Steps to Achievement, or what I like to call P8. Read the Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

73 Hits
0 Comments

When is achieving all your goals not good enough?

We’ve closed the books on another year, and it’s time to review your performance. Maybe you’ve completed all your goals -- congratulations you’ve failed. Failed? How could that be, I’ve completed all my goals? And therein lies the problem, you didn’t set your goals (or the bar) high enough for your own performance. Goals by definition are aspirations and should be set high enough to stretch the organization and yourself in new directions. If you are constantly beating your goals, you’re not stretching enough.

But why don’t we set our goals high enough? Well, it’s complicated. It has a lot to do with you, and with equal parts of your companies’ culture and goal setting process.

Take this simple test: Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

82 Hits
0 Comments

Patient Care Experience Beyond the Medicine

INTEGRATING SUPPORT SERVICES AND FAMILIES FOR PSYCHOSOCIAL CARE.

He is that family member we all know, regrettably often looked upon as bothersome, annoying or cantankerous. Throughout my career in home health, skilled nursing and acute care, these family members are at every level – anywhere that involves caring for vulnerable patients.

One doesn’t even have to be in patient care – simply working in healthcare means each of us will likely deal with these troublesome family members at one time or another.

I was still a teenager when I first encountered “the husband” as we came to know him. Little did I know that those few days with him would have an impact upon my entire future, and that of my very role as a healthcare leader.

Interacting with patients’ families while working both in dietary as a dishwasher/server and facilities as housekeeping/maintenance taught me the importance of both support services and family members within the patient care experience – beyond the medicine. Read Full Article

89 Hits
0 Comments

A visionary leader is proactive

Reactive vs Proactive Leadership

I do a lot of reading on leadership. About 2 years ago, I read a book in which the author briefly contrasted reactive and proactive leaders. The author said that reactive leader does not seem to anticipate problems and does not see them coming until they are blowing up in his face. The reactive leader is constantly putting out fires. The proactive leader on the other hand sees problems just as they are starting to grow, or even before they begin, and calmly takes quiet and gentle steps to correct and avert so that the conflicts and disruptions are minimized or even completely prevented.

A reactive leader may be confronted with ugly contentions for any combination of the following reasons:

  1. Does not see the problem or consider that it might develop.
  2. Sees the potential problem, but does not want to be bothered over something that “might” happen.
  3. Sees the problem, but is afraid to act.
  4. Created the problem by misguided attempts to solve other problems.
  5. Enjoys contention and creates problems in part to create sparring opportunities or opportunities to assert dominance that are ego driven rather than leadership required.

The proactive leader does as Walter Gretzsky did and skates “to where the puck is going, not where it has been.” He has an eye to future disruptions. He sees the problems and is ready, willing and unafraid to act. He does not shy away from healthy conflict resolution, but prevents or minimizes unhealthy contention within his organization. He may disrupt his organization to move it where it needs to be to survive and thrive, but he will not allow his organization to be disrupted to no purpose.

I recently read an online article that presented reactive and proactive leaders as two equally valid leadership styles.i The reactive leader is presented in this article as strong in the surprise conflict, but weak in anticipatory leadership and the proactive leader as strong in long-range planning, but weak when called upon to “shoot from the hip.” I could not disagree more. A reactive leader is responding to whatever hits him and cannot have a firm hand on the tiller of the organization. For the proactive leader, the ability to extrapolate likely future scenarios and to predict human nature and act with vision and foresight does not make one unable to act upon the present urgencies and emergencies. Indeed, a proactive leader who has an eye to the future will be able to craft acute conflict resolution that is long lasting and strengthening to the organization.

Now, here is the part that stuns me, yet I have seen time and time to be true. This unknown author says that the reactive leader is often seen as the stronger leader, because he is often seen with guns blazing at a terrible dragon he is slaying for the organization, even if he is the one who fed and nurtured that dragon. The proactive leader is too often seen as weak or irrelevant. Why is he even needed? The organization seems to run itself. He often addresses problems discretely allowing key stakeholders to save face in front of the rest of the organization while bringing them effectively back on track. So much of what he does is unseen so it is assumed that it is not happening.

iPROACTIVE OR REACTIVE LEADERSHIP, WHICH IS MOST EFFECTIVE IN THE WORKPLACE? VICKY BAILEY, 2016-12-02

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

122 Hits
0 Comments

The Fourth Discipline: Transition Management

Leadership Transformation Series

This is Part 1 of a Four-Part Leadership Transformation Series (LTS).

2012 Womens Olympic Triathlon finish in London - After two hours of racing with the best in the world, what would one or two seconds in transition time have meant for the top three athletes?

Transformation in healthcare is personal: it requires the transformation of health system leaders. This LTS begins to speak to key differences in some of the fundamentals of transformational vs traditional leadership in healthcare.

This article focuses on how the nature of our work is changing.

Many compare the healthcare transformation journey to one of our oldest Olympic sports: “It’s a marathon!” Although this might reflect the persistence, resilience and endurance sentiment, I offer an analogy upgrade from one of our newest Olympic sports: “It’s a triathlon!”

Why?

First, transformation requires mastery of multiple disciplines. We – and our organizations - may have competency in one or two disciplines, but adaptive learning is required to develop and integrate the different and stronger skills needed for next level or breakthrough performance. We cannot count on simply doing more of the same ‘one foot in front of the other’ plodding and grinding to advance our mission – our people are burning out. Unlike in the run or bike, the first triathlon discipline – the swim - does not ask as much of the legs. While the upper body provides most of the forward propulsion, for swim speed it is more important to reduce drag. Drag is not a material factor in running, but it is in running our organizations – and barnacles, barriers and anchors come in many, mostly self-inflicted, forms.( Read Full Article)

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

140 Hits
0 Comments

Want to build your culture -- start by sweeping the floor!

Over the years, I’ve heard many stories, inspirational stories on leadership, one of my favorites involves President John F. Kennedy and his first visit to NASA in 1962. As the story goes, the President was touring the facility when he came across a janitor carrying a broom down the same hallway as the touring President. Kennedy, a great lover of people stopped him and asked him what he did for NASA, not missing a beat he replied, “I’m helping to put a man on the moon”.

As I reflect on this, I’m struck by the absolute simplicity of this statement, but also the way it speaks volumes. This individual clearly understood that he was an integral part of the team, no matter what the role. If he did his job well, he contributed to the overall success of the team, engineer, scientist, astronauts etc. His job, although different in almost every way imaginable from his colleagues, still contributed to achieving the overall goal, that of putting a man on the moon. Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

131 Hits
0 Comments

Focus on Culture for Patient and Family Care: Beyond the Medicine

As healthcare (including acute care, nursing homes, home health and all downstream providers) moves towards a greater focus on patient/family satisfaction, the model of healthcare must also evolve, for both the government and patients/families will be closely reviewing these in determining healthcare provider(s) of choice. A satisfied patient is a more compliant patient, making for a more engaged patient. Providers at every level must now move beyond the patient centered approach, into an understanding of the patient/family perspective and be willing and able to convert input to action and measurable goals, benefiting staff, patients and families. Read Full Article

125 Hits
0 Comments

Take your team to first place -- by putting yourself last

Many high performing companies have discovered the value of servant leadership, which simply defined is serving others first. When leaders make this simple, but fundamental mind shift, the culture and the organization will follow as will bottom line results. Employees working under leaders who put their needs first, build self-confidence, make decisions more autonomously, have greater job satisfaction and engagement, and are more likely to practice this same style with their direct reports.

How does servant leadership build organizational and team performance? Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

132 Hits
0 Comments

Healthcare Integration: Ship-to-Shore Work and the Ultimate Weapon

Veterans Day reminds me of my father. In WWII, he landed on Omaha Beach on D-Day.

As Steven Ambrose details in his book “D-Day,” the Allies planned the Normandy invasion for three years, but as soon as our troops hit the beaches, the plans went out the window. To the ‘man on the ground,’ NOTHING was as planned. And on the beaches, formal leaders were dead or not available. Survival and progress to save the free world depended on rapid learning and action, i.e., adaptive leadership. Our troops felt empowered to act, German forces felt compelled to wait for Hitler’s direction. The rest of this leadership story, as they say, is history.

Despite asserting to my Dad, in my youth, the growing impact of technology, e.g., pilotless planes, long-range capabilities, etc., he remained convicted of the mantra “the ultimate weapon is the man on the ground.”* My Dad and his colleagues, some of whom made it past D-Day, are heroes. I have since learned that there were others “on the ground” back in the U.S. who heroically enabled these heroes. During the planning for the largest invasion in modern history, a significant challenge was figuring out how to get our troops from ‘ship-to-shore.’ The U.S. federal government knew how make large ships to get our troops across the English Channel, but they could not get our troops to the shore. Enter Andrew Jackson Higgins, who was described by Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1964 as “the man who won the war for us.” (Read Full Article)

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

151 Hits
0 Comments

Is it 'Mission Impossible' for healthcare? Why mission-driven leadership is still the answer.

Healthcare has been in a tremendous period of change, mergers, acquisitions, leadership restructures, and new and improved strategic plans and priorities fill the time of most leaders. During this time of change, many leaders may wonder privately, does the mission of this organization still matter? Or is it only about the bottom line?.

When looking at high performing companies outside of healthcare, they all share some things in common, first, they have a clear and well spelled out purpose/mission. This is important so everyone, front line staff to executives can understand the why we are here, and how we will define success. This is not just a feel-good statement, and properly developed and executed this has the potential to pull people forward, especially during uncertain or difficult times. Read Full Article

Connect with us on LinkedIn, join our Active Network Program and look at the other areas of connection we offer.

132 Hits
0 Comments