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Everyone recognizes nursing plays a huge and vital role in our hospitals and healthcare systems today. Nursing, like any other area of healthcare, needs experienced coaches and mentors.

Please remember the optimum word here is experienced.

Here are some of my observations from my 27 years of healthcare experience:

  • The aging of America will create more need for nurses and nursing leadership.
  • Nurses don't seem to be very well represented in the CEO role.
  • Because of their training, they seem to struggle with their assimilation into that role.
  • Nurses move up into management roles within the nursing department because they were good nurses which doesn't always guarantee they'll be good managers.
  • Like many others who are promoted into management roles, nurses are generally not offered a great deal of assistance as they move into these new and challenging positions.
  • The chief nursing officer role is not attractive to younger nurses developing their careers.

Wiederhold & Associates believes that Nurse Leadership is an important area to invest in. We know that the very skills that make effective nurses (great communicators, creative problem-solving abilities and leadership acumen) are also the skills that make great leaders. With proper guidance, the transition into a senior leadership role can be very successful.

To maximize the success of our nursing clients, we have partnered with Nursing Leadership Coach Diane Scott. With her strong clinical background, Diane has a deep understanding of the nurse executive role.

Diane explains, "Senior nursing leaders usually are in charge of the majority of theworkforce of any healthcare organization. They are often promoted through the ranks and experience challenges with increasing their ability to critically think at their new leadership level. However, once they reach that level, the new challenge is the overwhelming desire to meet the mission of patient care and balance a seemingly polar opposite of managing the numbers, especially financials. They also struggle with developing a self-strategy for their career, finding it too self-serving and not patient driven.

The most successful senior nursing leaders learn that by increasing their own abilities, they can achieve their own potential, develop their managers as well as provide excellent patient care. In this way, everyone benefits under leadership that understands needs from the ground up."

At Wiederhold & Associates, we know an organization can optimally increase a nursing leaders’ capacity for successful outcomes through professional Nursing Leadership Coaching. It is the single most powerful way for a leader to achieve their potential for superior leadership, strategic thinking, and measurable results.

If you would like to learn more about our Nursing Leadership Program, download a tri-fold brochure here

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Do you know your numbers? (not just finance)

“It’s a nice day outside.” Does this mean it’s 65 degrees, 75, 82? It depends on who you ask. Unless you ascribe a numerical measure to something it will never be fully clear to an audience. So many executives I advise are not fully clear when talking about their career accomplishments- I’ve been guilty of this as well. “We grew revenue and patient satisfaction improved when I was at XYZ Health System” or “We set up this corporation, joint venture, committee, etc.” These are simply not clear statements when compared to, “We grew revenue by 35% and our patient satisfaction improved from the 12th percentile to the 67th percentile” or “We started a new joint venture that grew market share by 34% and grew net revenue by 40%”.

Many comparisons have been made between the airline industry and healthcare. The pilot knows where the plane is going by following specific numerical coordinates. Do you know your X-Y? What was the origin and destination of your last journey? This is communicated simply by knowing your X-Y’s in one or more of the following areas: service, patient safety, quality, growth, service line development, finance, community benefit, market share, cost containment, productivity, physician or employee engagement, turnover, etc. When X-Y’s are communicated well it sounds like this… “When I was at XYZ health system our HCAHPs went from the 23rd percentile to the 78th percentile over 4 years” or “During my tenure we reduced RN turnover from 35% to 16% in three years.

Organizations want results. If you clearly communicate that you achieve results, your chances for success improve when looking for your next job. Contact www.wiederholdassoc.com for more information on learning how to communicate your “X-Y’s” and taking the next step in developing your career.

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Hospitals/Health systems across the country are faced with increasing financial pressure including slow economic recovery, decreases in reimbursement, increases in uninsured or underinsured leading to increased bad debt write offs, and increased operating expenses.

Not surprisingly the result is more and more organizations that were financially sound find themselves either in financial distress or at least moving financially in the “wrong direction.” Turning around a hospital where finances are in decline requires extremely strong leadership from the top, ideally a CEO with prior experience leading a turnaround. This initiative needs to be supported by the hospital senior leadership team and board, and reinforced by engaged employees, physicians, and even members of the communities served by the organization.

Hospital turnarounds are not just about cutting costs. You can’t cut your way to long-term growth and profitability. You need to build programs that will financially support the hospital and meet the community’s needs through physician recruitment and capital investment. Cutting costs are a short term sometimes necessary endeavor, but long term success will only come from program volume and revenue growth.

It’s now essential in the current evolving environment to negotiate favorable contracts with insurers and other networks who control patient access and also consider the development of Accountable Care Organizations and other population health strategies. Finally developing key affiliations and networks with other hospital and healthcare providers are essential to strengthen your gaps in services and geographic coverage.

While no two turnaround situations are ever the same, just as no two sick patients are ever exactly the same, there are some common elements that all successful turnaround situations will have.

These elements includes the following:

  • A strong visionary CEO with proven experience in leading a successful turnaround.
  • A strong committed board that will support the CEO and put what is good for the long term survival of the hospital ahead of long-standing personal friendships and relationships and agendas and the short term pain and changes that may have to occur.
  • A good comprehensive and realistic turnaround action plan based on an in-depth assessment of the hospitals financial, operational, cost structure, market position and also physician and community perception and support. The plan should identify specific goals and objectives and actionable plans with quantifiable metrics and assignment of ownership.

Implementing the turnaround plan:

  • Implement plan with sense of urgency.
  • Monitor results and modify tactics where necessary.
  • CEO stays engaged / leads from “the front.”
  • Divides resources/removes obstacles/drive changes forward.
  • CEO and leadership team “walks the walk” and “talks the talk.”
  • Communication -- CEO establishes robust communication process so that employees & physicians are kept fully informed of changes occurring and why they need to occur and to gain their support for the long term benefit to the organization.
  • Publicize and celebrate the successes. Nothing breeds success, like success.

Going through a “turnaround” situation is one of the most stressful events for any healthcare organization to go through. With great visionary leadership and a good “plan” the organization will emerge not only more financially sound but with a “high performance” culture ready to move on new challenges.

You can see Davide Carbone's LinkedIn profile here

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How often in my conversation with executives do I hear the statement, "he/she is good at reading the tea leaves" or "he/she is not so good at reading the tea leaves"?

What does it mean?

To me, it indicates a sense of external awareness of what's being said around you. When the action and the talk don’t align – you’d better take notice. Unfortunately, a lot of executives get so caught up in their own internal world that they are unaware of what's going on around them.

There's lots of evidence to support this lack of external awareness. In working with executives in transition, I often hear the statement “I never saw it coming.” As I review the details of their last 60 to 90 days of employment and then we review it together, the next statement I often hear is –“I should've seen it coming. Obviously, that executive didn't do a good job of "reading the tea leaves."

Now most of us are aware of the concepts emotional intelligence and political intelligence.

  • Emotional intelligence is the capacity to be aware of, control, and express one's emotions, and to handle interpersonal relationships judiciously and empathetically.
  • Political intelligence is a thorough understanding of the interpersonal and political dynamics that organizational structures create and to know how to make things happen within this context.

We define these concepts in terms of both nouns and verbs. As you know, a verb implies action, and both forms of intelligence must have an action to be of any benefit.

Both terms suggest a strong emphasis on the external environment as well as the internal environment. As mentioned, too many executives become overly focused on the internal environment. By practicing the art of emotional intelligence and political intelligence you will learn to pay attention to the external as well as the internal and increase your ability to read the tea leaves.

Happy Reading,

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Why should an organization hire you? What do you bring to the table that helps the organization win? What are you known for? If you aren’t communicating these answers briefly and succinctly (backed with facts), you are not standing out and will have a tougher time with your job search. Do not assume your experience and resume speaks for itself. Most people do not read every word of your resume- they scan it and size you up in a matter of seconds. Do not make people guess or leave it up to chance- tell them what you are known for and how you create value for organizations.

Almost 100% of the executives I speak with in my executive advisor role for Wiederhold & Associates do not understand and communicate their value proposition. This is nothing more than personal branding- think of yourself as a business. What brand messages are you communicating? Most people will believe you are who you say you are. For example, if you’re known for growing market share and you communicate this simple message (backed with facts), you have just communicated a brand message.

How do you identify your value proposition? Look at your career accomplishments and look for consistent results. It will likely come from results in service, patient safety, quality, net revenue growth, service line development, employee/physician engagement, turnover, cost containment, productivity, market share, profitability, turnarounds, community benefit or engagement, etc

A well communicated value proposition looks like this, “I am known as a turnaround expert. For example, in my last role I led a $20 million turnaround” or “I am known for getting results in patient satisfaction. For example, in my last role we improved HCAHPs from the 12th percentile to the 75th percentile”.

Be intentional and purposeful about your value proposition- if not it will be defined for you (or not at all). For help in crafting your personal brand, go to www.wiederholdassoc.com for a free consultation.

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A big piece of onboarding is the ability to manage up- how you effectively work with your immediate Manager. My experience in this area indicates that we don't give this enough attention. The conflict that begins here usually ends up in one being asked to leave the organization or perhaps exiting too soon on their own.

Often, different styles, as well as egos, get in the way. Change the way you look at this relationship, and you will be more successful in building it. I haven't come across many people who “manage up” t extremely well, and it's such a necessary skill to one's future success. Embracing the employee/manager relationship is a critical skill to hone and managing up helps you master it.

Managing up means that you go above and beyond the tasks outlined on your job description. You continuously go the extra mile. Your job is to make your immediate manager’s life easier.

Ways to effectively manage up:

  • Listen well
  • Learn his/her style
  • Jump in when needed
  • Project a positive attitude
  • Deliver quality work
  • Keep him/her well-informed
  • Build key relationships
  • Sell/negotiate when appropriate
  • Recognize what he/she respects and honors
  • Create early wins
  • Execute great follow up
  • Establish a comfortable level of transparency
  • Establish the rules of effective pushback
  • When you have a challenge, always offer a solution
  • Communicate, communicate, communicate
  • Close information gaps
  • Have a voice beyond your boss
  • Keep commitments
  • Apologize when you are wrong
  • Don’t make excuses

Learning to effectively "manage up" can put you in a great position to align with your immediate supervisor, integrate effectively with the organizational culture, receive great recommendations, and ultimately help you on board effectively.

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Coaching comes in many forms but the goal is to help you become the very best version of yourself as a leader, executive, and whole person.

As you know, I have been coaching executives for years to help them become their best. Through the power of technology, my coaching capabilities have been extended into a new dimension. I am excited to present the 2016 Webinar & Telebridge Series.

Webinars:

Once a month, Wiederhold & Associates will be inviting renowned speakers to address leadership topics in healthcare in this interactive online series. The next scheduled webinar is in April and will be free to ALL registrants. Beginning in May, we will continue to offer these webinars free to only our Premium Active Network Group members and current clients. There will be a nominal registration fee for everyone else. There are limited spots for each session so make sure you register early and take advantage of this opportunity to learn from national experts! Email us to request topics and dates.

Telebridge Calls:

As a new benefit of our Premium Active Network membership in 2016, Wiederhold & Associates will implement the following program each month. I am hosting a Telebridge (conference call) meeting with any of our premium active network members who want to participate. In that meeting, I will answer questions you may have related to your career, whether you are gainfully employed, in transition, or thinking of looking for a new position. This is sure to be a time of enrichment that will aid you in developing a lifetime of success.

Before each TeleBridge meeting, we will announce the initial topic of discussion. Once we conclude that topic, we will move on to other subjects relevant to the group. Our first meeting was an excellent discussion of interim work in the healthcare Industry from both sides of the equation. This will be the initial subject of our next TeleBridge Premium Active Network meeting. After the initial topic is addressed, any subject that the group wants to talk about is fair game.

I will facilitate these meetings as well as disseminate a summary to the participants from these sessions. The Telebridge calls are an excellent opportunity to learn and engage with relevant healthcare subjects.

Through these programs, you are sure to make valuable connections & gain critical industry insights throughout the year. I look forward to connecting with you.

Here's to your success,

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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To execute well in a network meeting or an interview, you must present yourself in a powerful way. As most of you are aware, the elevator speech has long been utilized as a tool in this area. This presentation focuses on who you are, what you've accomplished and where you're going. At Wiederhold & Associates, we have refined the elevator speech and taken it to a different level.

We call ours the "2-Minute Presentation", and when done correctly, will connect you to your audience as well as align you with the opportunity or the situation.

The 2-Minute Presentation should be as close to 2 minutes as possible, be modified to fit different audiences and contain three distinct components:

  • Humanization
  • Elevator
  • Differentiation

Basically, it's your elevator speech on steroids. Here's how it works.

Humanization

The goal is to make a connection. It's amazing what happens when you find a mutual connecting point to your audience. Remember, relationships are built on personal information, not business. Lastly, the power of the concept of "I, therefore, you." If I share something with you of a personal nature, you will feel compelled to share something with me. Connecting to people on a personal level is an essential part of both networking and interviewing.

Elevator

There are two key messages here:

  • My career moves are logical.
  • I'm clearly on the left side of the career bell curve and the best is yet to come.

The Differentiation Statement

The differentiation statement answers these two questions in a powerful way:

  • Why should I hire you?
  • What distinguishes you from other network connections or candidates?

Bring Your A-Game

Both networking and interviewing have become highly competitive. On top of that, people have limited time to give you. Bring your A-game with one of the most powerful tools you can put in your toolbox - a well developed 2-Minute Presentation.

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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As one wise recruiter once told me, "You can have a B resume which may open the door but you must have an A interview to walk through it."

Let me share ten basic elements that consistently come up in our interview reviews that if addressed would make a world of improvement in your ability to interview and drive the right message:

  1. Preparation: Know the five top critical elements of the opportunity and be able to address them with current experience and success. The five top criteria is the top five things they're looking for in their next candidate. Next understand the three other critical elements which are organization, position and location. Have specific information in each one as to your interest. The more specific the higher the impact.
  2. Mirroring: A good interview is like a dance, both partners are in sync with each other. Mirror to match tempo, breathing, rate-of-speech, directness, etc. This makes each one comfortable with each other and sets the correct filter.
  3. Listening to understand: We test this in every interview we do and the majority of people fail. We are so caught up in the world of listening to respond that we miss a vital part of the question.
  4. Introduce yourself with confidence.
  5. Take the lead: As you enter the interview, know exactly the statement you will make or the open-ended question you'll ask. Demonstrate your interpersonal skills and give yourself the greatest opportunity to connect with and engage your audience.
  6. Put together an effective two-minute presentation which includes three key components to drive your message as well as connect with your audience. Those components are humanization, elevator, and differentiation/value statement.
  7. Understand what a real achievement is and present that way.
  8. Answer questions concisely, close information gaps and enhance the answer when it adds value to the original thought.
  9. Always tell the truth but word it in a win-win presentation. This will provide consistency throughout the interview.
  10. Brand yourself so that your message is consistent.

I've done a lot of interview coaching over the last 22 years. Historically, most people have a starting grade in their ability to interview probably somewhere around a B- to a C+ through no fault of their own. We just don't do well on things we don't practice consistently. But imagine if you took the time to develop a well-executed interview. What a significant way to separate yourself from the crowd in a very competitive market!

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Landing Your Biggest Sale, Yourself!

Facilitating a successful job transition and search is a complex and intensive process. I have found most healthcare executives are trained and focused in their healthcare leadership roles, but are not experienced nor educated on how to conduct a successful job search and transition.

Frankly, most tend not to be very good at it.

Why is that? Most of us are good at things we do most of the time. None of us would be very good golfers if we golfed every two years. Job transitions are just like that. Executives don't have the opportunity to practice these skills often and there is real value in finding a coach or a partner who can accelerate the process.

Let me share a case of an executive that had tried to go it alone in her job transition and learned that with the right coach, training and navigation she could be very successful in her transition. She had the wisdom to realize she needed guidance to be successful.

To give you some insight, the client was a very high-level executive in a large health system. She had been trying to find a position on her own for approximately two years without success. Her organization had merged with another system who had the stronger position in the merger. The position they had offered her was not at the level she had been at and she decided to move on. She began conducting her own search process and was not as successful as she wanted to be. Eventually, she reached out to me for transition coaching.

What did she learn:

  • I didn't know what I didn't know.
  • I was not familiar with the current market and how competitive it is.
  • My approach to networking was limited and therefore I didn't have a deep or substantial network.

What were her outcomes:

  • My perspective on networking changed; it's much bigger and deeper than I thought it was.
  • My relationship building skills improved.
  • My communication skills improved.
  • Jim as a coach was always available to me. Especially at high anxiety points.
  • I was shown how I could do things better in the process.
  • My goals for the transition needed to be broadened. I was often coached to add another needed step.

Working with this executive was a very rewarding journey for me because she had been out so long and was concerned about her ability to make a successful transition. We quickly moved her forward with the appropriate skills and were successful in helping her land a very good position. She was an excellent partner.

Transition and search is a very specific sales process – the process of selling yourself! With the right coaching, education and practice you can have a very successful result.

Here's to your success,

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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First and foremost, I want to wish you much success in 2016.

The new year is a time to start new journeys. As you know there are journeys we choose and journeys that choose us.

So with that in mind, we took a real good look at the people we work with in career transition and found that the most successful ones had three consistent behaviors. Those three behaviors were passion, attitude and confidence.

Passion is one's intense desire or enthusiasm to do something. The level of passion for these successful individuals kept them on track even when there were challenges and bumps in the road. They did not roll over or quit when things got tough.

Attitude is how an individual's behavior reacts to a person place or thing. We live in a world where most individuals focus on the negative side of a challenge. Successful individuals took a more positive look at the challenge of career transition and focused in on the benefits that would result from this journey.

Confidence is one's assessment and feelings about their own skills and qualities. These successful individuals realized that they live in a deposit/withdrawal system. Unfortunately, withdrawals are automatic and deposits have to be made manually. They have learned how to make necessary deposits.

So as you begin your journeys in this new year remember to pack the right amount of passion, attitude and confidence. Because a good start usually means a good finish.

Here's to your success,

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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I constantly hear the statement that nothing happens between Thanksgiving and New Year's day. That idea becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy that can prevent you from moving forward in the new year.

The time between Thanksgiving and New Year's day is what I referred to as Relationship/Gratitude month.

It is the perfect time to build and solidify relationships by giving thanks to those that have helped you in the past year as well as those that will help you in the new year. This show of gratitude, when done without an agenda and with great sincerity, will strengthen business partnerships that can carry you into the new year and beyond.

As you all know, the opposite of gratitude is ingratitude. When you don't express gratitude and you assume the other person understands your perspective, what you really are expressing and certainly not intending to, is ingratitude.

Call up those people that have given you so much over the past six months to a year and just say thank you. Use the holiday season to send out cards to those you don't call. Individualize each card with a note and your own signature. Make your audience feel special. Remember, this is about quality not quantity.

If done correctly, these efforts in December will pay rich dividends in the first quarter of 2016.

Here's to a prosperous new year!

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Twenty-seven years in this business and I'm still amazed at what people will say or do. The sad situation is that many times, these unintentional faux pas are the things that result in slowing down or ending a promising career. We all need to take communication seriously and build in filters through practice to minimize communication gaps.

Two key causes of communication gaps:
Our emotions and lack of awareness

Simple examples:

In an interview you are asked why are you no longer with your former company. Your response is, "I resigned." Do you believe that people are going to think this was a positive event or a negative one? You just created an information gap.

You're the CEO of a company and every time you leave your office to go to the lunch room you are in deep thought. You never acknowledge anybody along the way, you're just focused on your thoughts. What do you think the perception will be from those around you who experience this? You just created an information gap.

An information gap can be created by what we say, what we don't say, what we do and what we don't do.

It is unfortunately human nature to fill a gap with negative information. Real control is achieved when we're able to say things and act in a way that insures to the highest degree that the message we are sending is received as we want it to be received.

Best tactics to diminish information gaps:

  • Increase your awareness of how your actions and statements could affect others
  • Refrain from any kind of emotional response
  • Practice softening your verbiage
  • If you're not sure about what you are going to say bounce it off of a confidant
  • Learn to recognize these gaps when you create them and close them immediately

Your words are powerful and they can hurt deeply as well as distort your real meaning. Learning to filter will allow you to say even the most challenging statements appropriately and still deliver your message.

For your career success learn to BRIDGE THE GAP!

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Fast Track Success Through
Strategic Alignment

There are many important components to a successful onboarding program but the key starting point is alignment with your immediate supervisor. If alignment is not properly established from the beginning, the train will derail sooner or later.

The best way to achieve the expectations of your new supervisor is to know what he or she wants from you. I recommend scheduling a strategic alignment meeting with your immediate supervisor prior to, or immediately upon starting your new position.

Use these key components for a successful meeting:

  • Be prepared: Organize your thoughts.
  • Begin with an attempt to engage the other individual in what sets a positive tone.
  • Try to learn as much about him or her as you can. Ask questions to find out what they are passionate about both in and outside of the workplace.
  • Seek to understand before being understood.
  • Discuss desired outcomes, achievements, and expectations based on your prior conversations with your new supervisor as well as others in the organization.
  • Be ready to respond with your thoughts on items such as projects that need to be achieved within designated time frames.
  • Clarify expectations/achievements/outcomes over the next 3 to 6 months.
  • Do not make assumptions: Ask intelligent questions until you have a clear understanding of those expectations/achievements/outcomes.
  • After your meeting, ask yourself, "How closely do these expectations align my own thoughts?"
  • Keep in mind the concept, "under promise over deliver."

An important topic to discuss is how your supervisor would like you to push back if you are in disagreement with them. Clarifying how to handle conflict is an important preventative discussion to avoid future issues that can erode your relationship.

Finalizing this alignment of expectations achievement and outcomes may go beyond this first meeting. This is key, especially if the expectations are unrealistic or not remotely close to what you thought they would be.

A strategic alignment meeting with your supervisor is worth the time and effort. It ensures that both of you are on the same page, establishes a good communication pattern, and allows you a safe path to pushback.

A good start creates a solid foundation to build on going forward.

Here's to your success,

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Build Key Relationships

As leaders progress up the executive ladder, their ability to build effective relationships becomes much more important to their success.

There is a delicate balance to be struck between being viewed as successful based on your experience as well as your ability to connect with people. When this becomes unbalanced on either side of the equation, the results can be very negative.

To build relationships with depth, start with sincerity and a genuine interest in people. Since most executives have limited time, it is important to identify the individuals where these solid relationships are important. For executives, I refer to this as their "stakeholder list". This could be anyone who will have great influence on the success or failure of the executive.

To Increase a relationship with another individual, consciously move it along that corridor from stranger toward friend. I'm not saying you have to reach the ultimate goal of friendship but you do have to keep moving the relationship forward.

When you move the relationship forward you affect what I call "the filter". The filter is how that person sees you. When there is a relationship on some level, that filter tends to be very positive. What does that mean to you? The other individual tends to let in only things that support that favorable impression. On the flipside, if that filter is negative, it tends to only let in negative information. A simple analogy could be the following: Who would you fire first: a stranger or a friend? Who would you hire first: a stranger or friend?

Some useful tactics to enhance relationships:

  • Sincerity
  • Be a listener with enthusiasm
  • Find connecting points – common interests, experiences, etc
  • Find their passion – what are the things that excite and motivate them?
  • Consistency- keep a predictable tempo to the relationship
  • Caring
  • See the world from their perspective
  • Find ways to help
  • Be proactive about the relationship

To be successful, work to strengthen key stakeholder relationships.

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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Are you creating and executing a roadmap that will assist you in moving up within your organization?

The whole concept of internal transition or advancement for executives I find is often neglected. Like overall career planning, without a roadmap, executives have no rudder or direction in mind.

As a result of having no real advancement direction or plan, these are the most prevalent outcomes:

  • Career growth in their current company is slow to nonexistent
  • They leave the organization too early and possibly create a negative ongoing pattern predictable change

Neglected areas are often:

  • No plan for growth within the organization
  • No key stakeholder list
  • Lack of appropriate self-promotion
  • Poor outcomes alignment with immediate boss
  • Weak political acumen
  • Ineffective soft skills
  • No clear vision and strategy
  • Lack of developing a strong team

These are certainly not all of the issues but key ones I often see. Setting a roadmap, following the path and focusing on the key areas needed for your success will help you reach your end goal. That next stop on the career path may be within your existing organization or you will be well positioned for that next opportunity outside the organization.

What is that old saying?

What is that old saying? "If you don’t know where you are going you will never get there."

Enjoy the drive!

Jim

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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As the health care system confronts the need to change and adapt in the new era, leadership is required throughout the entire organization.

Nursing Leaders are the centerpiece of care delivery and are extraordinarily vital and influential in carrying out the mission and vision of any healthcare organization. As a result, their leadership has a direct effect on the quality and fiscal outcomes that are of vital importance to an organization.

At Wiederhold & Associates, we know an organization can optimally increase a nursing leaders’ capacity for successful outcomes through professional Nursing Leadership Coaching. It is the single most powerful way for a leader to achieve their potential for superior leadership, strategic thinking, and measurable results.

Coaching is customized to every situation and organization, with outcomes driven models implemented to ensure success.

Who can benefit?

  • Senior Nursing Executives
  • Nursing Directors and Managers
  • Newly hired Nursing Executives who wish to position themselves out of the gate for great success
  • High potential Nurse Executives who can benefit from expanding their strategic thinking
  • Nurse Executives who want to continue to provide optimal leadership for the patients and the people who care for them

Nursing Leadership Teams

Team Coaching is different from training in that it specifically targets the needs of a group, while providing direction to challenge them to meet a targeted outcome. Teams that can benefit from our approach include:

  • High functioning teams wishing to expand their capacities
  • Teams experiencing significant changes or challenges
  • Newly formed Nursing Leadership Teams

Want to move your organization forward?

Invest in your core: Nursing Leadership.

Connect with us on LinkedIn and join our Active Network Program.

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The majority of us plan for our children’s college education, or to get married or stay single but unfortunately very few executives plan their careers. Many potentially successful executives fail to climb the executive ladder because they don’t plan where they want their career to advance to.

Healthcare professionals can progress in their careers, but only if they position themselves for success.

In my experience, less than 5% of healthcare executives plan their career. Most, as I would say, “wing it”; taking advantage of opportunities as they present.

I describe career planning like building a straight fence. You define where you want to go and then identify the points and steps it takes to get there.

Successful executives complete a gap analysis: what are they missing for experience and skills. Skills fall in two categories: hard skills and soft skills. Executives often focus on the hard skills areas and miss the needs for developing soft skills: communications, conflict management, effective messaging, emotional intelligence, relationship building etc.

Through my work with executives in transition, 95% of people in transition lost their job due to a lack of emphasis and engagement in the soft skills.

Preparing to climb the ladder requires a plan that includes the skills both hard and soft to be successful. Successful executives must master emotional intelligence and navigating the political landscape to stay at the top of that ladder.

Here’s to your success!

Jim

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When you think of an --Effective Leader-- what comes to mind?

You might picture someone who never lets their temper get out of control, no matter what problems they are facing. Or you might think of someone who has the complete trust of their staff, listens to their team, is easy to talk tThese are qualities of someone with a high degree of emotional intelligence (EQ). Research shows that EQ scores climb with titles from the bottom of the corporate ladder upward toward middle management. Middle managers stand out with the highest EQ scores in the workplace because companies tend to promote people into these positions who are level-headed and good with people. The assumption here is that a manager with a high EQ is someone for whom people will want to work, and always makes careful, informed decisions.

These are qualities of someone with a high degree of emotional intelligence (EQ). Research shows that EQ scores climb with titles from the bottom of the corporate ladder upward toward middle management. Middle managers stand out with the highest EQ scores in the workplace because companies tend to promote people into these positions who are level-headed and good with people. The assumption here is that a manager with a high EQ is someone for whom people will want to work.

But things change drastically as you move beyond middle management. For the titles of director and above, scores descend with CEOs, on average, having the lowest EQ scores in the workplace.

The truth is that for every title the top performers are those with the highest EQ scores. Even though CEOs have the lowest EQ scores in the workplace, the best-performing CEOs are those with the highest EQs. You might get promoted with a low EQ, but you won't outshine your high-EQ competition in your new role.

Your emotional intelligence is completely under your control. Work on your EQ and it will boost your performance. Your effort can also ensure that you don't experience declines as you climb the corporate ladder. Even if your employer promotes you for the wrong reasons, you'll still outperform your contemporaries.

To help you get started, here are some EQ-boosting strategies for leaders:

  • Acknowledge Other People's Feelings
  • When You Care, Show it
  • Keep Your Emotions in Check
  • Sleep
  • Remove Negative Self-Talk

Focus on your EQ and your executive performance will soar!

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For years now, turnover rates for CEOs in the healthcare industry have been high. While they peaked at 20 percent in 2013, even today these rates remain decisively higher than in other industries. In the ever-evolving world of healthcare, it can be challenging for CEOs to plan for their departure. Even something as simple as deciding when to break the news to their team can involve endless considerations.

The plight of healthcare CEOs is unique in this regard. In many other prominent industries, it’s common for CEOs to give notice of their departure just weeks or even days in advance. On June 11 of this year, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo made an announcement that he would be stepping down on the first of July. In some industries, the announcement of departure may even take place after the CEO has already stepped down and a successor has been selected.

For CEOs in the healthcare industry, their departures are rarely that simple. While crafting a succession plan is crucial for all outgoing CEOs, sometimes just picking a date to make the announcement can be difficult.

Robin Singleton serves as the executive vice president and practice leader of National Healthcare Practice at DHR International. Singleton says if a departure announcement is made too early, the CEO might simply be fired. On the other hand, if they announce their departure too late, the board will not have adequate time to ensure a smooth transition.

According to Singleton, the average announcement of a CEOs departure in the healthcare industry comes between 9 and 12 months ahead of time. Paul Esselmen, senior executive vice president and managing director at Cejka Search, says that the transition time depends on the circumstances under which the CEO is leaving. At a minimum, Esselmen says that a CEO should provide 60 days’ notice to both their board and the executive team.

Singleton says that CEOs give their boards such advanced notice due to the culture in the healthcare industry. “They have a deep sense of commitment ultimately to their patients and they want to make sure their culture is protected,” says Singleton. For more information, visit:

http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-management-administration/when-should-a-hospital-ceo-give-notice.html
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